Ron Sheldon

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • in reply to: #ResearchBeforeFishing #196484
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Isabella,
    Well said…Your comments are wise beyond your years. You recognize and bring up the important point that throughout time man has been consumed by greed to deplete a resource and then move on to something else. I also like how you highlight that there is hope in those that recognize this trait and want to prevent it. This unpopular opinion is the solution to ensuring there are fishes for our future generations.

    in reply to: #Screwedbuthopeful #196483
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    As the grumpy old man in the class I love the hashtag. I think the most important point you make is that there is hope if people are willing to adapt and change. Sometimes we focus so much on the negative that we can overlook an opportunity to make a change and therefore make a difference for the future.

    in reply to: FISH 110 Midterm Exam Study Techniques and Methods Used #196403
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Wow. That is an impressive note taking system. I applaud your discipline to be able to stick to it. I may have to steal at least a portion of your technique for the final. My first notes are usually less than complete so i often just leave a space in between each line to fill out the whole thought. Copying them to the backside of the page would definitely help making them more understandable.

    in reply to: Studying #196402
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I am glad it’s not just me that is having trouble with taking notes. I think before the final I may need to sit down one day and binge watch the lectures once again. I just have to figure out where the recorded lectures are posted.

    in reply to: Pollock vs. Cod #196273
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I agree with your comparison but would question the views of pollock abundance. While there is a lot of science involved in the pollock fishery that was not present in the cod fishery, there is still little trust in catch numbers reported across nations. Where we can control the actions of U.S. based fishing vessels there is no guarantee that everyone is playing fair as highlighted by Bailey’s experience on the Japanese boat.

    in reply to: Alaska Pollock Fishery #196272
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I agree. One similarity that may cause problems in the future is the lack of one regulating body to control fishing. In addition to the fishing that goes on in unregulated waters, the lack of a set cooperation of harvest levels among nations there is a huge potential for overfishing.

    in reply to: Destructive Fishing Habits #196234
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Great recommendation. I hadn’t thought about it because you always assume that the destructive methods wouldn’t be allowed because after all, it is common sense. I don’t think most people understand the impact bottom trawling has on the environment. Bycatch gets most of the attention and although the fishing industry has made improvements to bottom trawl gear it is still very destructive.

    in reply to: Priorities for wild fishing #196232
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I agree and think this is a great 5th priority. One other thing that may help to augment your approach would be to drastically cut or eliminate environmental credits. The process of “swapping” great habitat for “marginal” habitat affects a lot of great coastal areas in the lower 48.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 3 months ago by Ron Sheldon.
    in reply to: Shifting Baselines #196111
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I like how you equate Greenberg’s shifting baseline theory to your personal experiences. It is very easy for us to base our perception of reality on what is front of us rather than taking the time to find out the full picture. Often the most valuable information from the older generation is dismissed. Also thanks for not bashing Fish and Game too bad…lol. Not to defend the department too much but sometimes they are making a decision under a lot of external pressure to “maximize opportunity” where public opinion outweighs scientific research. Take for example Chinook salmon on the Kenai. Scientific data would say the best thing that could be done for the Chinook fishery is to close it completely. However, pressure from tourism, sport fisherman, and local governments convince them each year to open it in some manner.

    in reply to: Shifting baseline #196110
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Very good personal example of shifting baselines. I really like how you incorporated your own observations and how they have shifted in your post. Often times it is very difficult to self evaluate our own perceptions in order to see the larger picture.

    in reply to: Galton's criteria for domestication #196008
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I like how you contrasted the strengths and weaknesses between the species. Additionally, it is obvious you did a little outside research as well as just relying on the book. One thing that I think is missing from Galton’s theory is necessity and familiararity. Both of these species were chosen for this reason and I think it is an additional point that must be considdered. After all, If someone had chosen any salmon (let’s say Chum) how many people would have wanted to dedicate the effort to farming them. Probably not many. But take a species that people already enjoyed like the Atlantic Salmon and Sea Bass and everyone is suddenly on board.

    in reply to: Suitable for Domestication? #196006
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Very well thought out response. I like how you detailed each species strenths and weaknesses as comparitive. I also wish we had been provided with a little more information. With a little research it is quite evident that both species respond fairly well to aquaculture after the kinks have been worked out. Salmon in particular are very easy to culture. We even let school kids do it in their classromms with fairly high success rates. Additionally, there are accounts of aquaculture in Sea Bass reaching 95% survival. Even though they didn’t meet the criteria it seems that where there is a will there is a way. I still won’t let my friends eat that crap though…

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Ron Sheldon.
    in reply to: Sustainability #195897
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I agree with your definition of sustainability and I like how you related it to Solow’s. It is our moral obligation to preserve species for future generations and that is where Solow’s argument goes astray. However, whether we like it or not I think that farmed salmon is sustaining wild salmon to a point. Not necessarily in the vein of replacement as Solow would suggest, but in the fact that the demand for salmon cannot be met with wild stocks alone and farmed salmon makes up the difference so that we can protect wild stocks for the future. In other words, let them eat their farmed fish so that we can stil have wild salmon. Let’s just hope that we can find away to lessen or eliminate the burden it places on the environment.

    in reply to: Sustainability #195895
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    I agree with your definition of sustainability. I think we have a moral obligation to leave things as good as or better than they are for our future generations. I also like that you linked how farmed salmon is sustaining wild stocks because it relieves pressure on them. As much as we all may hate farmed fish it is a necessary evil to fill the void in the marketplace caused by the reduction in harvest of wild salmon.

    in reply to: AquaAdvantage vs Salmon Domesticus #195775
    Ron Sheldon
    Participant

    Let me start by saying wow. The fact that you see the utility and good that can come from salmon farming is great. It is not a popular view, especially amongst fisheries students. Personnally, I wish there were a “magical” solution to meeting the market demand through wild salmon but there just isn’t. Additionally, I think that the most important steps in the future is developing feeds for these farms that don’t compete with wild stocks and figuring out how to eliminate the environmental effects of salmon farming. I still won’t let my friends eat farmed fish but for everyone else in the lower 48 and the rest of the world I guess it’s ok.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)

Fish and Fisheries in a Changing World