Sustainable Candidates

Home Forums Due September 24 by 11:59pm Sustainable Candidates

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  • #195956
    knmcarthur
    Participant

    Atlantic salmon and Sea Bass, in general, have a few things in common. Both are highly sought after fish in terms of their use commercially; they both taste really good. Problem is, there are only so many of them naturally in the wild, so the solution to this problem is to domesticate them. Put the fish in a controlled area and raise them for one purpose: to sell them. Another problem is that Sea Bass, according to Greenberg, don’t follow the criteria set that would determine a good candidate for domestication. They aren’t hardy, are at best indifferent to man, aren’t comfort loving, don’t breed easily, and aren’t easy to tend. Thanasis went through a lot of trouble in his process to tame and figure out how to domesticate Sea Bass. Atlantic salmon may be more hardy than Sea Bass due to the fact that they lay less eggs and a higher percentage of those eggs tend to live. They are probably also indifferent to man, however I can’t think of a fish that has an inborn liking for man. Salmon do seem to be more comfort-loving because while in captivity they will eat the food provided. Also, salmon are pretty easy to tend compared to Sea Bass. I’d infer that Atlantic Salmon do make good candidates for aquaculture because they meet most of the criteria laid out by Greenberg. Sea Bass however, don’t seem like they’d make a good candidate for aquaculture, but Thanasis over time, figured out how to make it work.

    #195993
    armathews3
    Participant

    Spot on, did you work in a Hatchery or visit them?

    #196002
    knmcarthur
    Participant

    Yes, over the summer I worked at a hatchery and I tagged Chinook and coho salmon with coded wire tags. I also got to be a part of the spawning process and observe how they collect and fertilize the eggs.

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Fish and Fisheries in a Changing World