Cod vs Pollock

Home Forums Due October 29 Cod vs Pollock

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  • #196286
    Kortney Birch
    Participant

    In the introduction of Billion Dollar Fish, Kevin Bailey states that the Alaska Pollock fishery has been one of the world’s largest fisheries since the 80’s. Pollock has been a huge leading factor for human consumption, because of the fishery. From their much desired eggs in Asian cultures to their common white meat being used in all sorts of food products, they are the perfect fish for the job. But the normal trend is for a big time fish to decrease over time. Since the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, world pollock catch rates have been in decline because maybe “the white gold rush ended” (Bailey 13). This leads me right into the Northern Cod fishery. Both of these fisheries were overly abundant then somehow, over the years, the populations dropped and people weren’t able to get what they were demanding. The cod fishery was taken for granted and no one actually thought such an abundant fish could ever have issues, so they just kept catching them. So the cod and pollock are quite similar in this sense. Despite these consistent trends, a different pollock fishery in the Eastern Bering Sea has been able to withstand changing stock sizes and is still very successful. Despite the constant unknown of whether these fish are thriving or dying, many animal populations seem to be following the declining trend due to human consumption.

    #196306
    knmcarthur
    Participant

    I agree, also the pollock fishery was managed a whole lot better than the cod fishery, resulting in a slower decline of the stocks. This is excluding the crash of the crab stocks in the 1980’s which caused a jump in the amount of pollock being caught over the years.

    #196336
    jltusten
    Participant

    I agree that the pollock are managed much better than the cod, making them a much more successful fishery.

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